Animal Antics

 

 Random acts of kindness. Kindness is a quality that shows you… | by Waleed  Tariq | Medium

 

 Ancient black swans hunted to extinction, NZ's swans from ...

                              

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Tufted capuchin - New England Primate Conservancy

Capuchin Monkeys - Gold- Bellied Monkey Facts & Information

 

WHITE-THROATED CAPUCHIN LIFE EXPECTANCY

White Throated Capuchin Monkey

Brown capuchin | monkey | Britannica

Tufted Capuchin Monkey

Tufted Capuchin Monkey, Piaui State, Brazil by Sean Crane - The tufted  capuchin, also known as brown capuchin, black-capp… | Capuchin monkey,  Monkeys funny, Monkey

Monkey Tool Time | WIRED

Capuchins always look mad and grumpy.

upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/50/Mal...

The third photo is gorgeous.

Mountain Gorrila

Mountain gorilla | primate | Britannica

Fossils Shed New Light on Human–Gorilla Split - Scientific American

Aww so cute.

Great photos, thanks Celia.

I agree.

ADORABLE ONE-EYED CAT ADOPTED BY MAN WHO LOST HIS EYE IN CAR ACCIDENT

Posted by Katie Valentine | October 19, 2020

Adorable One-Eyed Cat Adopted by Man Who Lost His Eye in Car AccidentRepresentative Image via PxHere/ukkimkr

A man who recently lost his eye in a car accident adopted a one-eyed kitten after losing his cat of 20 years, and the pair quickly became best friends.

Several months after 62-year-old Larry Scott’s cat passed away, he and his wife decided to welcome a new furry family member. While visiting a local shelter in September, the couple from Marion, Ohio, spotted a cat with a missing eye and instantly knew they had to adopt him.

“Really, we weren’t looking for a one-eyed cat,” Scott told People. “My wife was just like ‘Look at this, we have to adopt him,’ and I was like ‘Okay.'”

The three-month-old kitten was extremely ill when he arrived at the shelter, and vets had to remove his eye due to a bacterial infection. Despite this setback, he is active and happy.

“He loves toys and plays with them nonstop,” said Scott. “This cat will play all day long. At three, almost four months, he’ll play like there’s no more time to do it.”

Scott has experienced his fair share of struggles. He experienced multiple brain hemorrhages and had to learn how to walk again after a car crash in 2015. He also lost his eye because of that crash.

Both the one-eyed man and one-eyed kitten are doing much better now. While Scott and his wife work on choosing a name for their new adorable kitten, they continue to bond and enjoy their time together.

Ah poor baby.  Hope they will be happy together.

Escape from an elephant: Jumbo chases after a car after being startled by passing vehicles in Kenya  Elephant chases after a car after being startled in Kenya

The giant female elephant towered over the car and appeared poised to trample it before the driver sped away, after another motorist alarmed the animal by racing down the rural road in Kenya. The scene was captured on camera by 43-year-old Mwangi Kirubi, who was waiting in a car to take pictures in Amboseli National Park when two other vehicles hurried past him. That prompted the herd's matriarch to approach a fourth car where some of Mwangi's fellow photographers were waiting - forcing them to flee.

Trunk at the ready: The elephant chases after the car but the motor vehicle eventually manages to outrun the giant mammal   Trunk at the ready: The elephant chases after the car but the motor vehicle eventually manages to outrun the giant mammal

Sure puts the size of these elephants into perspective. You would not want the car to break down, scary.

11 Facts About Blue Whales, the Largest Animals Ever on Earth

The blue whale, the largest whale in the world

Madonna Barr - Green, clean and earth friendly tips!

Incognito you made me want to compare things having said that!

 

Life saver: Oscar winner Judi Dench has revealed that acting is not her only talent, as she recounted once resuscitating her pet goldfish with the kiss of life  

Life saver: Oscar winner Judi Dench has revealed that acting is not her only talent, as she recounted once resuscitating her pet goldfish with the kiss of life.

'It died when it was very little and I gave it the kiss of life and it grew to be six inches long. We kept it in a nice tank.' 

Miraculous: Judi said that after saving its life 'when it was very little', the fish ended up growing to be six inches long (stock image)

Very chilled! Smiling polar bear lazily floats belly-up in a pool of water as it relaxes at German zoo Very chilled! Smiling polar bear lazily floats belly-up in a pool of water

A polar bear has been pictured lazily floating belly-up in a pool of water. The bear is just a year old and lives with its mother in a zoo in Hanover, Germany.   The photographs were taken by keen wildlife photographer Antje Wenner-Braun at the Hannover Adventure Zoo in Northern Germany. Mrs Wenner-Braun, 56, said: 'These bears have a spacious area with lots of water, meadows and places to relax. 'He loves the water, as you can see in the pictures. 'I think he has everything he loves, so he's happy and having fun.'

The future looks bleak for wild polar bears with ice melting so fast. 

THIS DOG IS SAVING ENDANGERED WHALES WITH ONE VERY SPECIAL SKILL

Posted by Katie Valentine | October 16, 2020

This Dog Is Saving Endangered Whales with One Very Special SkillImage Credit: Instagram/eba_the_whale_dog

A once-abandoned mixed-breed dog named Eba is now helping conservation biologists study endangered whales by sniffing out their poop.

Orca researcher Dr. Debra Giles adopted the left-behind pooch without any plan to train her for this valuable work.

“I had no idea when I kept her that she was going to become a conservation canine,” Dr. Giles told TODAY.

 

Eba was just a few weeks old and weighed only three-and-a-half pounds when she appeared outside a Sacramento, Calif. shelter. Very cold and wet, Eba had to warm up on a heating pad before rescuers could take her temperature. The pup spent months recovering before ending up in Giles’s care.

It quickly became apparent that Eba was a perfect candidate for Conservation Canines, a program run by her guardian’s employer, the University of Washington Center for Conservation Biology. The organization rescues dogs, many of whom end up at shelters due to their high energy levels, and trains them to detect whale scat.

 

Eba’s persistently playful nature got her the initial interview. Giles asked the program’s director for permission to take her newly-adopted pup out to sea, and the rest was history.

Eba proved to be a natural and has worked with Conservation Canines ever since.

“By Eba’s second day on the water, she found her first wild whale scat by herself,” Giles, who documents the dog’s adventures on Instagram, explained, “which was amazing.”

 

Whale scat provides researchers with important information about orcas’ stress levels, whether they’re pregnant, what pollutants they are ingesting, and more. By detecting the feces, dogs like Eba provide an invaluable service to those who are working diligently to save endangered whales.

“That’s where the dog comes in because they can smell these things from a mile away,” Giles said, “literally a mile away.”

Eba’s story reminds us that the so-called ‘undesirable’ traits that often land dogs in shelters are exactly what makes them special to some pet parents, and that there’s a perfect forever home for every companion animal.

Great story Incognito, thank you for sharing.

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