Animal Antics

 

 Random acts of kindness. Kindness is a quality that shows you… | by Waleed  Tariq | Medium

 

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Hilarious Cat and Dog Photos Animal Lovers Need to See | Reader's Digest

Cats Who Simply Cannot Deny Their Affection For Dogs | Cute animals, Pets,  Animals

Baby looks very comfy, great place to sleep as long as the dog doesn't move.

50 Times Dogs Managed To Fall Asleep In Awkwardly Funny Positions

German Shepherds Are Bad Family Dogs - Here Are 50 Reasons Why | Dog  parents, Family dogs, Dogs and puppies

So cute.

Two German Shepherd Dog Twins Everything you want to know about GSDs.  Health and beauty recommendatio… | German shepherd dogs, German shepherd  puppies, Shepherd dog

FUNNY DOGS, prepare yourself to CRY WITH LAUGHTER! - Best DOG VIDEOS -  YouTube

dog selfies :-) | Funny animal quotes, Funny animals, Funny dogs

Hilarious photo's. Gave me a laugh, thanks

This adorable calf has been able to take her first steps, thanks to a custom-made wheelchair that was donated to her.

SWNS

Ruby Sue was born with her back legs fused together and would have been euthanized if it wasn’t for animal lovers at the ‘Safe in Austin Rescue’ ranch in Texas.

Vets discovered that despite her disability Ruby Sue was happy, healthy, and pain-free. She just needed something to help her walk.

 

That’s when experts at the pet mobility company Walkin’ Pets stepped in to save the day.

“With only her front legs to support her, Ruby was unable to stand or walk on her own” said Jennifer Pratt, Marketing Manager for the New Hampshire-based company.

The team at Walkin’ Pets decided to donate a custom-made chair to the two-week old calf, so she can run on the grass with her furry friends at the Safe in Austin Rescue.

RELATED: Watch the Determined Bull That Thinks He’s a Show-Jumping Horse

“Because of these wheels, Ruby Sue is able to stand on her own, allowing her to get the exercise she needs to strengthen her front legs and learn how to walk for the very first time,” added Jennifer.

SWNS

For the last 20 years, Walkin’ Pets has been helping animals to walk, run, and play with their nifty inventions.

 

Each wheelchair is equipped with sturdy wheels and soft bands that support the pet—no matter what their size.

As the years have progressed, the company has expanded the capabilities of their wheelchairs to accommodate ducks, chickens, and even tortoises around the world.

Rear wheelchairs, which are built similarly to training-wheels, can range anywhere from $150 to $400 depending on the size of the animal.

MORE: Touching Footage Shows Cow Joining In For a Duet While Woman Serenades It

Reps at the company say they’ve made a commitment to design wheelchairs that provide a high quality of life for every animal, regardless of whether it quacks, barks, or—in this case—moos.

Touching story Incognito, but my concern is what happens when she gets full size?   I can understand these supports for smaller animals, but when the animal gets larger it could be dangerous if she falls over on a child or an elderly person.

I think they hope it will strengthen it's legs enough to be able to walk without aids, no doubt it will be looked after at the rescue farm. We have one in Australia called Edgar's Mission and they do the same thing and have great success with some animals.

CONSERVATION EFFORTS HAVE SAVED NEARLY 50 ANIMAL SPECIES FROM EXTINCTION SINCE 1993, NEW STUDY FINDS

Posted by Lex Talamo | September 22, 2020

Conservation Efforts Have Saved Nearly 50 Animal Species from Extinction Since 1993, New Study FindsA scimitar-horned oryx is one of the species saved from extinction by conservation efforts, according to a new study. Image via Wikimedia Commons.

Conservation efforts have saved almost 50 bird and mammal species from going extinct over the past three decades, a new study found.

Researchers at Newcastle University, a public research university based in the United Kingdom, and BirdLife International, a global partnership of nonprofits dedicated to protecting birds and their habitats, analyzed 60 species listed as endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List (Red List) since 1993. 

They also looked at conservation efforts taken to protect those species, including control of invasive species, habitat protection, reintroduction programs, zoo-based conservation initiatives, and formal legal protections.

Results published in the journal Conservation Letters found conservation efforts have kept 48 species across more than 20 countries from going extinct.

Survivors include the bright-eyed Iberian Lynx, the darling pygmy hog, and the majestic California condor. Also included in the list of species saved are the gorgeous jewel-colored Puerto Rican amazon and Spix’s macaw, Mongolia’s regal wild Przewalksi horses, and the imposing scimitar-horned oryx. 

The study determined extinction rates for species would have been three to four times higher without conservation efforts.

Despite the good news, the call to conserve the planet’s biodiversity remains urgent.

The study also highlighted that 15 species have gone extinct or are strongly suspected to have disappeared since 1993, despite conservation efforts. The three top threats to both bird and mammal species are invasive species, encroaching agriculture and aquaculture operations, and hunting, as identified by the study.

The Red List still assesses more than 6,800 species as “critically endangered,” including the playful porpoises known as vaquitas who live in the Gulf of California and remain decimated by illegal fishing operations. 

But Phil McGowan,  a Newcastle University professor who co-led the study, said the study’s findings offer “a glimmer of hope” that should encourage governments to continue commitments to protecting endangered species.

“There is no doubt that we are facing an unprecedented loss in biodiversity through human activity,” McGowan said. “The loss of entire species can be stopped if there is sufficient will to do so. This is a call to action: showing the scale of the issue and what we can achieve if we act now to support conservation and prevent extinction.”

Great news, thanks Incognito.

 

 

 

 

The road’s been sealed off! Lost elephant seal brings mayhem to Chilean town as it shuffles through the streets before locals guise it back to sea

The giant seal had managed to shuffle around ten blocks in Puerto Cisnes, ChilePolice, Chilean Navy officials and locals blocked off its route further inlandUsing tarpaulin, they were able to redirect the seal back towards the oceanIt made it back in to the water just in time for the local coronavirus curfew

  

A lost elephant seal the size of a small car brought mayhem to a Chilean town on Monday as it shuffled through the streets before locals guided it back to sea.   

The huge animal managed to lumber down ten blocks of a residential area of Puerto Cisnes, in the country's southern Patagonian region, before returning to its natural habitat with a little bit of help from the locals.

Police and Chilean Navy officials joined local residents as they sealed off streets leading further inland with cars and plastic sheeting before using the same tarpaulin to guide it back to the ocean.

 This giant elephant seal made it around ten block into the the Chilean town of Puerto Cisnes before locals blocked its path further inland and guided it back to the oceanUsing tarpaulin, the locals were able to block the seal from going further inland and also guide it back through the streets towards the ocean 
 

Using tarpaulin, the locals were able to block the seal from going further inland and also guide it back through the streets towards the ocean

Lost seal guided back to the sea by locals in Chilean town  

Other Good Samaritans threw buckets of water over the confused animal to keep it hydrated.

Manuel Novoa, a presenter at local radio station Radio Autentica FM who shot footage of the incident and offered a live commentary of the rescue, said: 'Look at all the people who are helping and are using tarpaulin to circle it.

'It's just a few feet from the sea now. The work neighbours have done has been incredible. They're giving it time to rest because it's covered around 10 blocks and must be very tired.'

A dog was even seen joining in at one point, wagging its tail as it ran up to the army of helpers running behind the elephant seal as it sped up its belly flops along the tarmac after realising the water was within touching distance.

Applause rang out as the animal made it to the ocean between fishing boats anchored by the water's edge and disappeared into the darkness.

A Navy official told Mr Novoa as volunteers packed up their plastic sheeting and returned home: 'I want to thank the local community in the name of the Chilean Navy.

'It was a great effort. The seal is safe now and out of danger from humans and dogs that could do it damage.

The seal had shuffled around ten block into the town before locals blocked its path and turned it back in the right direction 
 

The seal had shuffled around ten block into the town before locals blocked its path and turned it back in the right direction

Local poured buckets of water over the seal to keep it hydrated and stopped to give it regular breaks to make sure it did not get exhausted 
 

Local poured buckets of water over the seal to keep it hydrated and stopped to give it regular breaks to make sure it did not get exhausted

'We're very happy and we'll be carrying out constant patrols to make sure it doesn't return to dry land and suffer an accident.

Navy Captain Christian Reyes Jofre said in a subsequent statement: 'We ask people when they see these animals not to approach them or take their pets to see them.

'A safe distance should be maintained to give them the peace and calm they need so they don't become disorientated or stressed.' 

A dog was even seen joining in at one point, wagging its tail as it ran up to the army of helpers running behind the elephant seal 
 

A dog was even seen joining in at one point, wagging its tail as it ran up to the army of helpers running behind the elephant seal 

The bizarre episode has been linked to the fact the normally busy town is on coronavirus lockdown and its streets are silent at night-time because of a Covid-19 curfew.

A witness named only as Antonia told local press: 'It was moving very quickly. My son spotted it first and initially he was frightened.

'I had never seen an elephant seal so close up, and certainly never in a populated area. You usually see them in the sea and a long distance from land.'

Once it saw the ocean, it sped up its belly-flops and to its relief and that of the locals, successfully returned to its natural habitat just in time for the coronavirus curfew 
 

Once it saw the ocean, it sped up its belly-flops and to its relief and that of the locals, successfully returned to its natural habitat just in time for the coronavirus curfew

Southern elephant seals, the type found in southern Chile, were hunted to the brink of extinction by the end of the 19th century, but their numbers have since recovered.

They spend up to 80 per cent of their lives in the ocean and can hold their breath for more than 100 minutes, longer than any other non cetacean mammal.

They take their names from the large nose of the adult males which resemble an elephant's trunk. 

The seals typically reach a length of 16ft and a weight around three tonnes.

 

 

I saw this on the news, great effort by the people, lucky it was a success to send him back to the ocean, was quite a big seal too.

Agrre Incognito.

 

Wild animals such as lions, tigers and apes could catch Covid-19 from humans and act as 'reservoirs' for the virus - leading to repeat outbreaks

Researchers from Belgium have again found that the strain of coronavirus which causes Covid-19, called SARS-CoV-2, can infect many different species of animal and not just humans

Mammals which are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and in close contact with people 

Zoological 

Leopard Arabian camelPanda Polar bear Wild yak Macaque Golden snub-nosed monkey OrangutanGorillaBonoboChimp 

Domestic 

RabbitGolden hamster  Dog Chinese hamster Squirrel Guinea pig Cat 

 

Agricultural 

Sheep Cow Cow hybrid Bos Indicus Domestic Yak  Ferret Goat Donkey Horse Pig 

 

Scientists suggest precautions such as 'physical distancing, wearing face masks and gloves, and frequent decontamination' should be taken by people who come into direct and indirect contact with feral or wild animals to ensure the animals do not become infected  
 

Scientists suggest precautions such as 'physical distancing, wearing face masks and gloves, and frequent decontamination' should be taken by people who come into direct and indirect contact with feral or wild animals to ensure the animals do not become infected 

The study pointed out that conservationists, forestry workers, pest control staff and wildlife tourists could unknowingly transmit the virus to these wild animals.

Other groups include ecological consultancy workers, managers and staff of protected areas and natural environments, and staff in wildlife rehabilitation centres.

Scientists suggest precautions should be taken by people who come into direct and indirect contact with feral or wild animals. 

Dr Gryseels said: 'During such activities, we recommend sanitary precautions such as physical distancing, wearing face masks and gloves, and frequent decontamination, which are very similar to regulations currently imposed to prevent transmission among humans.

'We further recommend active surveillance of domestic and feral animals that could act as SARS-CoV-2 intermediate hosts between humans and wild mammals.

Findings were published in the journal Mammal Review.

 

I think it makes sense to be careful with wild and feral animals anyway, covid or no covid, they can carry a lot of bacteria.

ADVERTISEMENT Puppy love! Photographer showcases furry friends putting their normal animosity aside

The animals - typically considered enemies - are captured cuddling up together Photographer Mark Taylor, 56, spends days achieving the perfect animal pictureCarried on the legacy of his late mother Jane Burton, 74, who pioneered the style

  

Cats and dogs put their differences aside to share fluffy embraces in a series of adorable photographs.

The animals - typically considered enemies - are captured cuddling up together by photographer Mark Taylor, 56.

Mr Taylor, of Guildford, Surrey, spends days achieving the perfect picture with his four-legged subjects and his work is in demand all over the world.

Cats and dogs put their differences aside to share fluffy embraces in a series of adorable photographs 
 

Cats and dogs put their differences aside to share fluffy embraces in a series of adorable photographs

Mr Taylor, of Guildford, Surrey, spends days achieving the perfect picture with his four-legged subjects 
 

 Mr Taylor, of Guildford, Surrey, spends days achieving the perfect picture with his four-legged subjects

.

The animals - typically considered enemies - are captured cuddling up together by photographer Mark Taylor, 56.

Mr Taylor, of Guildford, Surrey, spends days achieving the perfect picture with his four-legged subjects and his work is in demand all over the world.

Cats and dogs put their differences aside to share fluffy embraces in a series of adorable photographs 
 

Cats and dogs put their differences aside to share fluffy embraces in a series of adorable photographs

Mr Taylor, of Guildford, Surrey, spends days achieving the perfect picture with his four-legged subjects 
 

 Mr Taylor, of Guildford, Surrey, spends days achieving the perfect picture with his four-legged subjects

 
  

The animals - typically considered enemies - are captured cuddling up together by photographer Mark Taylor, 56

He carried on the legacy of his late mother Jane Burton, 74, who pioneered the style - which results in adorably cute animal pairings that are sure to melt the hardest heart.

 

 

Such gorgeous photo's. Reminds me of my pets in the past. I had a ginger cat, then got a puppy and they ended up so close, I went travelling in Australia and had to give my cat away (went to a good home), and years later got a kitten given to me, well then the same dog got on so well together with the kitten, they ended up so close, so much so that when the dog died, the cat was pining for days. They used to cuddle up every night to sleep on the floor next to me, so i had to let the cat up on the bed for the first time.

What delightful photos Celia .

:) Very cute, thanks Celia.

 

 

I love this!

 

 

Bow WOW! Aussie pet owner creates ingenious dog-sized holes in the fence for her labradors so they can watch her walk up the driveway

A video of dogs pushing their noses through holes in a front fence has gone viral  The fence has holes for their nose and eyes so they can look at the street 

Two cute labradors are seen poking their noses out as their owner arrives home Commentators said video inspired them to make peep holes for their own pets

Adorable footage of two excited dogs watching their owner arrive home through special holes in a fence has gone viral.  The cute video was uploaded to liltroubless's Tik Tok page on Wednesday and shows two labradors rushing round the front yard as their owner returns home. As the owner approaches the front fence, the dogs push their noses through a custom-made hole with two holes above it so they can see. 

 

A video of dogs pushing their noses through holes in a front fence (pictured) has gone viral   A video of dogs pushing their noses through holes in a front fence (pictured) has gone viral The video shows two cute labradors poking their noses out of a fence (pictured) as their owner arrives home

The video shows two cute labradors poking their noses out of a fence (pictured) as their owner arrives home

So funny and cute, they obviously worked out how to use it quite fast.

 

 

 

LOL

 

 

Jumbo slide! Playful baby elephants tumble down a muddy slope on their knees

 

NEW Fun-loving elephants found a faster way to travel down a muddy hill at the Elephant Freedom Village in northern Thailand - by sliding down the slope on their knees. Amusing footage, taken by their keeper Non on September 15, shows the lazy elephants tumbling down the hill on their stomachs while other elephants walk down the steep slope in the forest. Non-profit organisation Elephant Freedom Village said its elephants spend 90 per cent of their time in the forests, with their remaining time being spent in sheltered paddocks at night.

 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8818759/Playful-baby-elephants-tumble-muddy-slope-knees.html#v-2146664669148395813

 

Playful elephants decided to slide down a muddy hill instead of walk at the Elephant Freedom Village in the Chiang Mai province of northern Thailand    

Playful elephants decided to slide down a muddy hill instead of walk at the Elephant Freedom Village in the Chiang Mai province of northern Thailand

Adorable video footage, taken by elephant keeper Non on September 15, shows the fun-loving animals speeding down the muddy slope on their back legs  

Adorable video footage, taken by elephant keeper Non on September 15, shows the fun-loving animals speeding down the muddy slope on their back legs

Their mahout, or elephant keeper, Non captured the amusing footage of the animals playfully tumbling down the hill on September 15.

Non said: 'This is the cutest rollercoaster I have ever seen. My kids looked happy and I am glad that they were enjoying the outdoors.'

Mud, glorious mud! Samudra the elephant splashes and wallows...

 

Non-profit organisation Elephant Freedom Village said its elephants spend 90 per cent of their time in the forests, with their remaining time being spent in sheltered paddocks at night.

In the paddocks, the elephants are 'given fresh piles of food to graze from; enough to sustain them until the morning hours'. 

The  lazy elephants use their front legs to gain speed and let their back legs fall to the floor, happily sliding on their stomachs down the forest hill    

The  lazy elephants use their front legs to gain speed and let their back legs fall to the floor, happily sliding on their stomachs down the forest hill

The organisation rescues elephants with the aim of undoing 'the damage done by humans' and over time 'return them to the forest where they belong'. 

Thailand has at least 2,000 elephants living in the wild and a similar number in captivity.

They live in sanctuaries, elephant parks, zoos, tourist resorts or with private owners who use them for weddings and religious ceremonies.

 

 

Who would have thought they would enjoy mudsliding.

Please fur-give me! Naughty husky Oreo pulls the ultimate guilty face after tearing up its owner's sofa

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8819023/Funny-dog-moment-Husky-Oreo-pulls-ultimate-guilty-face-tearing-owners-sofa.html#v-8270828351070387852

The Chinese man was shocked to find the wreckage of his couch with shredded yellow foam scattered around his living room as he returned home. While going through his security camera footage, the pet owner spotted his naughty Husky, nicknamed Oreo, dragging the furniture with its teeth and tearing up the covers. After being caught, Oreo is seen in another clip lying on the destroyed sofa with a guilty look on its face, seemingly asking for its owner's forgiveness.

 

The husky appeared to know how to get away with its naughty behaviours Oreo is seen lying on the destroyed sofa with a guilty look on its face

The CCTV footage quickly became viral after the pet owner shared it on Chinese TikTok-like Douyin yesterday.

The man, living in east China's Hangzhou city, wrote in his post: 'Without the security camera, it is hard for me to imagine what this home has gone through when I'm not around.'

The naughty husky is seen in the video hauling the leather sofa around the living room before tearing the furniture into pieces and spitting them on the floor.

After tearing up the couch, Oreo moved onto the rubbish bin as it threw the trash out on the floor, creating a bigger mess.

The naughty husky is seen in the video hauling the leather sofa around the living room before tearing the furniture into pieces and spitting them on the floor. The CCTV footage quickly became viral after the pet owner shared it on Chinese TikTok-like Douyin yesterday 
 

The naughty husky is seen in the video hauling the leather sofa around the living room before tearing the furniture into pieces and spitting them on the floor. The CCTV footage quickly became viral after the pet owner shared it on Chinese TikTok-like Douyin yesterday

While Oreo went on a ‘spree of destruction’, the security camera also captured the other family dog, a golden retriever called Mixiu, calmly lying on the floor while watching it all happen 
 

While Oreo went on a 'spree of destruction', the security camera also captured the other family dog, a golden retriever called Mixiu, calmly lying on the floor while watching it all happen

While Oreo was going on a 'spree of destruction', the security camera also captured the other family dog, a golden retriever called Mixiu, calmly lying on the floor.

Despite wreaking havoc, the husky appeared to know how to get away with its naughty behaviours.

In another clip, Oreo is seen looking particularly guilty while lying on the sofa that it had just destroyed.

Millions of social media users were amused by the mischievous family dog as they pleaded the pet owner to forgive Oreo.

Despite wreaking havoc, Oreo appeared to know how to get away with its naughty behaviours  

Despite wreaking havoc, Oreo appeared to know how to get away with its naughty behaviours

 

 

 

This is what happens when you keep big dogs locked up indoors with not enough exercise, huskies especially need so much running.

I looked after one for a few weeks years ago, and I used to drive my car around the local country oval and she would run around following me, was the only way I could tire her out, and I would get big giant hugs from her, will never forget her.

Yes it is cruel to have dogs indoors like this; I remember the RSPCA in the UK got the government to changed Legislation so that it becomes illegal to own a dog and not exercise it outside daily.  

We had standard poodles one male was very big, we lived opposite a huge park with lakes, I used to get my old tennis racket and hit the ball for both of them for some time they just loved playing ball, not only with the racket but hide and seek too!

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